Image from page 87 of “One year course in English and American literature; an introduction to the chief authors in English and American literature, with reading lists and references for further study” (1909)

A few nice Travels in France images I found:

Image from page 87 of “One year course in English and American literature; an introduction to the chief authors in English and American literature, with reading lists and references for further study” (1909)

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Identifier: oneyearcourseine00heyd
Title: One year course in English and American literature; an introduction to the chief authors in English and American literature, with reading lists and references for further study
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Heydrick, Benjamin Alexander, 1871- [from old catalog]
Subjects: English literatureAmerican literature
Publisher: New York city, Hinds, Noble & Eldredge
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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f letters. Hewas born at Cockermouth, inYorkshire, educated at Cam-bridge, traveled in France andGermany, and finally establishedhimself at Rydal Mount in theLake region of England, notedfor the beauty of its naturalscenery. He married a womanof fine intelligence, Mary Hutch-inson, and was also fortunate inthe companionship of his sisterDorothy, whose tastes were like ^*6>r0r«~JX; *is own:. A, for!uate legacy from a friend, and later a gov-ernment position with light duties, supplied his simplewants and left him free to make poetry the serious occu-pation of his life. His first important work was a volumecalled Lyrical Ballads, the joint work of Wordsworth andColeridge, which appeared in 1798. This book marks anepoch in English poetry. It contained Coleridges AncientMariner, and a number of Wordsworths poems, includingthe famous Tintern Abbey. In the preface Wordsworthexplained his theory of poetry. His subjects, he said,were drawn from the ordinary life of persons living in rural

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WILLIAM WORDSWORTH 73 surroundings; he aimed to make these interesting bythrowing over -them the light of the imagination. Thelanguage of his poetry was not to be the artificial dictionof the classical school, who spoke of country people asnymphs and swains, and of morning as Aurora,but it was the language of ordinary life. Many of hispoems dealt with nature. To him nature was more thana thing to be described; it was something like a livingpresence, with power not only to delight but to moldcharacter. He tells us that One impulse from a vernal wood May teach you more of man.Of moral evil, and of good, Than all the sages can. He finds in nature the power to soothe and comfort themind, even in recollection of past sights. He says of thedaffodils in their beauty, Ten thousand saw I at a glance. Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. . . . I gazed, and gazed, but little thoughtWhat wealth the show to me had brought. For oft, when on my couch I lieIn vacant or in pensive mood,They flash u

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