Image from page 177 of “Programme” (1881)

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Image from page 177 of “Programme” (1881)

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Identifier: programme1516bost
Title: Programme
Year: 1881 (1880s)
Authors: Boston Symphony Orchestra
Subjects: Boston Symphony OrchestraConcert programs
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : Boston Symphony Orchestra
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Symphony Orchestra

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is the most successful movement (probably becauseit is easily intelligible). The musical world of Warsaw—Poles,Czechs, Germans, Italians—were invited to the rehearsal with fullorchestra, except trumpets and drums, September 22, 1830. ThenI have also to provide the desks and mutes, which I had yesterdaytotally forgotten: without the latter the Adagio would be whollyinsignificant and its success doubtful. The Rondo is effective, thefirst Allegro vigorous. Cursed self-love! And, if it is any ones faultthat I am conceited, it is yours, egoist: he who associates with sucha person becomes like him. The concert was given in the theatre at Warsaw on October 11, 1830.The programme was as follows:— Symphony Gorner First Allegro from the Concerto in E minor Chopin Aria with Chorus Soliva Sung by Miss Wolkow. Adagio and Rondo from the Concerto in E minor Chopin Overture to Guillaume Tell Rossini Cavatina from La Donna del lago Rossini Sung by Miss Gladkowska. Fantasia on Polish Airs Chopin

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mm^ TRIERS* C. Ed. Kakas, Pres.Wm. F. Kakas, Treas. Now in Our New Building 72 CHAUNCY STREET, BOSTON Formerly at 179 Tremont Street 154 Carlo Evasio Soliva, composer and singing-teacher, was born atCasal-Monferrato about 1792. He studied at Milan, and his opera,La Testa di Bronzo, was produced at the Scala in 1816. He taughtsinging at the Warsaw Conservatory from 1821 to 1832, when he wentto Petrograd, where he was made conductor and director of theopera in 1834. He also taught at the Imperial School and at thecourt; afterward travelled in Italy, and made his home in Paris, wherehe died in 1851. Among his works are four operas, sacred music, cham-ber music, songs, and a treatise on singing. George Sand wrote asonnet in memory of him:— Du beau dans tous les arts, disciple intelligent,Tu possedas longtemps la science profondeQue nencourage point la vanite dun mondeInsensible ou rebelle au modeste talent.Dans le style sacre, dans le style elegant,Sur le divin Mozart ta puissance se fo

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Image from page 322 of “Examples of household taste” (1875)

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Identifier: examplesofhouseh00smit
Title: Examples of household taste
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Smith, Walter, 1836-1886Smith, Walter, 1836-1886. Industrial art of the International Exhibition
Subjects: Centennial Exhibition (1876 : Philadelphia, Pa.)Decorative arts
Publisher: New York, R. Worthington
Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library

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divers readers that have already travelled in Italy, yet becauseunto many that neither have beene there, nor ever intend to go thither whilethey live, it will be a meere novelty, I will not let it passe unmentioned. Thefirst Italian fannes that I saw in Italy did I observe in this space betwixtPizighiton and Cremona; but afterwards I observed them common in mostplaces of Italy where I travelled. These fannes both men and women of thecountry doe carry, to coole themselves withall in the time of heat, by the oftenfanning of their faces. Most of them are very elegant and pretty things. Forwhereas the fanne consisteth of a painted piece of paper and a little woodenhandle; the paper, which is fastened into the top, is on both sides most curi-ously adorned with excellent pictures, either of amorous things tending todalliance, having some witty Italian verses or fine emblems written under them;or of some notable Italian city, with a briefe description thereof added there- INDUSTRIAL ART. 307

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Brass Corona Chandelier: Mitchell, Vance & Co., Mew York. 308 THE INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, 1876. unto. These fannes are of a meane price, for a man^may buy one of thefairest of them for so much money as countervailed our English groate. The two chairs covered with tapestry, illustrated on pages 304 and 305,which were exhibited in the French Court of the Main Building at the Cen-tennial, may be accepted as examples of the styles of furniture which Frenchupholsterers consider fit for use with this costly and most artistic covering. Theframes are of ebony or ebonized wood, ornamented with carving and gilding,but with these in rather less profusion than we are accustomed to see inParisian work of this nature. The shape and size of the chair-frame beinggiven, the design for the tapestry is made, and*4:hus a pattern following thelines of the frame and adapted to them is prepared. In one of our examplesit will be seen that cornucopias, bouquets and garlands of flowers are enclosedin one

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